Tech investment into Europe is surging — but it’s more than just a hedge for the US-China trade war

By: Sam Shead European tech start-ups have seen a huge surge in the amount of capital coming from investors in the U.S. and Asia this year, but it’s not because funds in these regions are simply “hedging” their bets amid the US-China trade war. So far this year, over 20% of European start-up funding rounds have included a U.S. or Asian investor, up from 10% in 2015, venture capital firm Atomico claimed in its annual State of European Tech report this week. The U.S.-China trade war makes Europe look like a relatively safe middle-ground, but that’s not why North American and Asian investors are choosing to back European start-ups, according to Tom Wehmeier, partner and head of research at Atomico. To read more:

Public fears about artificial intelligence are ‘not the fault of A.I.’ itself, tech exec says

By: Huileng Tan Consumer worries relating to AI include concerns about personal privacy and how the systems may get out of control , said Song Zhang, managing director for China at global software consultancy, ThoughtWorks.Zhang was speaking during a panel discussion discussing the “Future of AI” at CNBC’s East Tech West conference in the Nansha district of Guangzhou, China. The technology industry and policymakers need to address public concerns about artificial intelligence (AI) which are “not the fault of AI” itself, a tech executive said Tuesday. “It is the fault of developers, so we need to solve this problem,” said Song Zhang, managing director for China at global software consultancy, ThoughtWorks. Consumer worries relating to AI include concerns about personal privacy and how the systems

NASA Reveals Partnerships Advancing Moon, Mars Tech

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NASA selected 10 U.S. companies for 19 partnerships to mature industry-developed space technologies. As NASA prepares to land humans on the Moon by 2024 with the Artemis program, commercial companies are developing new technologies, working toward space ventures of their own, and looking to NASA for assistance. NASA centers will partner with the companies, which range from small businesses with fewer than a dozen employees to large aerospace organizations, to provide expertise, facilities, hardware and software at no cost. The partnerships aims to help advance the commercial space sector and help bring new capabilities to market that could benefit future NASA missions. To read more...